At Fairfield County Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Associates, PC (FCAAIA), we believe educated patients are more in control of their asthma and/or allergies. Our goal is to help you get the best care possible. That's why we strive to share our knowledge and be accessible to you. We're here to help!

Our practice has been serving Fairfield County, CT for over 30 years. Our doctors are Diplomates of the American Board of allergy and Immunology. Adult and pediatric allergy, asthma and clinical immunology with offices in Norwalk, Greenwich, Stamford, and Ridgefield.

If you have an immediate emergency, please call 911 first.

FCAAIA NEWS

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GLUTEN SENSITIVITY: PROBLEMS OF AN EMERGING CONDITION SEPARATE FROM CELIAC DISEASE

FCAAIA Notes: What is “gluten sensitivity?” Well, that’s the real issue here, isn’t it? Celiac Disease (gluten enteropathy) is certainly under-recognized in mild cases, but relatively easy to diagnose. However, numerous people are labeled “gluten sensitive” with out any diagnostic criteria or objective test that can be measured. Some people might have an exaggerated but normal physiologic response in which they feel full and tired after a large carbohydrate meal (such as pasta, bread, etc.). Others have different reproducible symptoms when they eat gluten-containing grains (wheat, rye, barley, oat, and spelt). Some might get a “placebo effect” by merely by eliminating a food or foods that are a big part of their diets. Continue reading “GLUTEN SENSITIVITY: PROBLEMS OF AN EMERGING CONDITION SEPARATE FROM CELIAC DISEASE”


THE INTRODUCTION OF ALLERGENIC FOODS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF REPORTED WHEEZING AND ECZEMA IN CHILDHOOD.

FCAAIA Notes: For years, the American Academy of Pediatrics and other groups recommended delaying the introduction of solid foods until 6 months of age if possible. These recommendations were based more on theory, hypothesis, and tradition than actual hard data. Because of emerging data and its desire to have its recommendations as evidence-based as possible, the AAP re-examined the issue and revised its recommendations a few years ago (Pediatrics 2008;121(1):183-91;also from the Section on Allergy and Immunology). Parents should discuss feeding solids to their infants with their pediatricians. They should consider using somewhat more caution when an older sibling is known to have food allergy. Continue reading “THE INTRODUCTION OF ALLERGENIC FOODS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF REPORTED WHEEZING AND ECZEMA IN CHILDHOOD.”


ALLERGY TESTS SHOULD ONLY CONFIRM DIAGNOSIS

FCAAIA Notes: This summary relates to some of the archived articles below. Its main points are that allergy tests should not generally be done as a “screening” test. Rather, testing should most often only be done to things considered to be possible triggers to a problem that has already occurred. Testing should be directed to relevant allergens and not to a “panel” of allergens chosen by the laboratory. Nothing is black and white; because many “false positive” and “false negative tests” occur, a thorough history should be done before tests are ordered and the tests should be interpreted by someone with an expertise in their meaning. The full article is a report from the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Allergy and Immunology Executive Committee written during Dr. Lester’s tenure on the Committee (Pediatrics. 2012;129:193-97.). Continue reading “ALLERGY TESTS SHOULD ONLY CONFIRM DIAGNOSIS”


TOPICAL AND SYSTEMIC THERAPIES FOR NICKEL ALLERGY

FCAAIA Notes: The form of contact dermatitis (or delayed-type hypersensitivity) with which most people are familiar is poison ivy. Nickel is also one of the most contact sensitizers and frequently manifests as an itchy, weepy rash where nickel touches the skin (jewelry, snaps from pants, belt buckles). The history is frequently enough to identify the cause of a contact “sensitizer”. However, patch testing may be necessary. Patch testing is different from skin testing for immediate-type hypersensitivity that allergists do. Sometimes, patients with contact sensitivity to nickel develop a diffuse rash from “systemic contact dermatitis” related to ingestion of nickel-containing foods. Patients with nickel sensitivity who require joint replacement might have patch testing done to other metals first. Continue reading “TOPICAL AND SYSTEMIC THERAPIES FOR NICKEL ALLERGY”


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