Tag: allergic rhinitis therapy

NEW GUIDELINES FOR ALLERGIC RHINITIS CHANGE TREATMENT

FCAAIA Notes: Allergies rhinitis (nasal allergies) affect 15-20% of the population.  Although many people “just live with it”, many also do not recognize the impact allergies have on their quality of life.  Nasal congestion is the symptom by  which people are most bothered, but fatigue, lack of concentration, and poor school or work performance are all major effects of poorly controlled allergies.

Allergies are a chronic, not an episodic disease.  However, allergies are still often treated only episodically.  These updated guidelines confirm what we already knew. Intranasal steroid sprays are the best choice for prevention of allergy symptoms. Several are available over the counter and are designed to be used every day. They are incredibly safe, Continue reading “NEW GUIDELINES FOR ALLERGIC RHINITIS CHANGE TREATMENT”

IS RESPONSE TO ALLERGY IMMUNOTHERAPY PREDICTABLE?

FCAAIA Notes: Allergen immunotherapy (IT) is the only disease-modifying treatment and thus the only potential cure for allergies. People respond at different rates to different extents, but it is a highly effective treatment.

For IT to be helpful, you need to come regularly to build up to the top dose.  High doses are more effective than lower doses. Continue reading “IS RESPONSE TO ALLERGY IMMUNOTHERAPY PREDICTABLE?”

UPDATES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SEASONAL ALLERGIC RHINITIS

FCAAIA Notes: This article is a concise review of medication options for treating nasal allergies. It does not go in to the specifics of one medication as compared to another.  The one glaring omission is that there is no discussion of immunotherapy, a potential cure for allergies. Continue reading “UPDATES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SEASONAL ALLERGIC RHINITIS”

ALLERGEN IMMUNOTHERAPY: AN UPDATED REVIEW OF SAFETY

FCAAIA Notes: The four broad categories of treatment for allergic rhinitis are avoidance of triggers, symptom reliever (rescue) medications, controller (preventive) medications, and allergen immunotherapy.  Only immunotherapy can “cure” the disease by changing the way your immune system recognizes and responds to the triggers of your nasal allergies.

Immunotherapy can be administered by injections (subcutaneous, “SCIT”) or under the tongue (sublingual “SLIT”).  Although many practitioners offer SLIT for all allergens as drops, SLIT is only available and FDA approved for grass and ragweed. Dust mite SLIT has been approved but is not commercially available yet.

Although there are not many well-controlled studies, SCIT is more effective than SLIT for pollen immunotherapy and Continue reading “ALLERGEN IMMUNOTHERAPY: AN UPDATED REVIEW OF SAFETY”

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