Tag: allergic rhinitis therapy

ODACTRA FIRST SUBLINGUAL THERAPY OK’D FOR HOUSE DUST MITE ALLERGY

FCAAIA Notes: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablets are already FDA approved for grass and ragweed. Personally, I have not found that they have a great role in the care of patients here in southwestern Connecticut. There are few patients so allergic to only those allergens that they require immunotherapy. If patients are on injections (subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy, SCIT) for multiple allergens, grass and ragweed are included if indicated. The tablets are very expensive and often not covered by insurance.

However, there are more patients allergic only to dust mites who are bad enough that immunotherapy is indicated.  SLIT tablets are an alternative for those patients when they reach the market.

A great weakness in the study and marketing of new products is that they are usually not compared to existing products in head-to-head studies. Continue reading “ODACTRA FIRST SUBLINGUAL THERAPY OK’D FOR HOUSE DUST MITE ALLERGY”

UPDATES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SEASONAL ALLERGIC RHINITIS

FCAAIA Notes: Everyone with allergies should make an attempt to decrease exposure to his or her triggers.  Everyone should try to find an effective symptom reliever to use as needed.  Everyone with moderate symptoms should use daily controller mediations. And, in accordance with current guidelines and practice parameters, everyone with moderate allergic rhinitis is a potential candidate for allergen immunotherapy (allergy shots).

BUT WAIT!  This review doesn’t even mention immunotherapy as an option and I don’t know why.  Immunotherapy has the potential to cure, not just control one’s disease Continue reading “UPDATES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SEASONAL ALLERGIC RHINITIS”

MANAGEMENT OF RHINOSINUSITIS: AN EVIDENCE BASED APPROACH

FCAAIA Notes: So if it looks like a sinus infection, smells like a sinus infection, and eels like a sinus infection, it must be a sinus infection, right?  Well, not necessarily. Every summary of chronic nasal and sinus disease will tell you that and that the overuse and abuse of antibiotics is common (Diagnosis and management of rhinosinusitis: A practice parameter update. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014; 113:347–385).  If your symptoms do not clear with antibiotics, you have to start to wonder if there is something else going on. Continue reading “MANAGEMENT OF RHINOSINUSITIS: AN EVIDENCE BASED APPROACH”

AAP: INDOOR ALLERGEN TESTING ‘A MUST’ FOR KIDS WITH ASTHMA

FCAAIA Notes: The vast majority of children with asthma have allergies and should have allergy testing.  Therefore, a thorough history of environmental exposures, correlated with the patient’s history and his testing results allow for focused recommendations for allergen avoidance.

The role of allergy in asthma is so well established that national and international guidelines for the care of asthma indicate that patients with persistent asthma (and allergy) should be considered candidates for allergy shots. Continue reading “AAP: INDOOR ALLERGEN TESTING ‘A MUST’ FOR KIDS WITH ASTHMA”

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