Tag: Allergy/asthma prevention

EARLY‐LIFE ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE INCREASES THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALLERGIC SYMPTOMS LATER IN LIFE: A META‐ANALYSIS

FCAAIA Notes: Here’s another one of those chicken and egg questions.  Are children at risk for allergic disease more likely to require antibiotics (for ear infection, for instance) than those without great risk? Or, do the antibiotics increase the risk? Or both

Antibiotics (and other things) change the human microbiome (the bacteria that normally live in and on us).  Alterations of the microbiome have been associated with numerous diseases (including allergies and asthma) over the last several years and is a major area of on-going research.

My vote on the chicken/egg question here? “Both.” Continue reading “EARLY‐LIFE ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE INCREASES THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALLERGIC SYMPTOMS LATER IN LIFE: A META‐ANALYSIS”

VITAMIN D FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ASTHMA

FCAAIA Notes:  Here we go-more vitamin D/asthma information. As noted many times before, sufficient levels of vitamin D contribute to better control of asthma. In this meta-analysis, it was clear that use of vitamin D can decrease the need for oral steroids for asthma flares, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations for asthma. Continue reading “VITAMIN D FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ASTHMA”

WHAT PATIENTS REALLY THINK ABOUT ASTHMA GUIDELINES

FCAAIA Notes:  The first national guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of asthma were published in 1993, with updates and revisions more recently.  Guidelines are just that-they are not rules or laws.  But, they are evidence based recommendations to help physicians maintain control of asthma, use as little medication necessary to do so, and to decrease the risk of complications of asthma.

It is important for our patients to understand the basis and rationale for our treatment recommendations.  They should ask any questions they have, but realize that “empowerment” is not just knowledge; it is in essence consent and agreement that comes from understanding.  Continue reading “WHAT PATIENTS REALLY THINK ABOUT ASTHMA GUIDELINES”

PREDICTIVE FACTORS FOR MODERATE OR SEVERE EXACERBATIONS IN ASTHMA PATIENTS RECEIVING OUTPATIENT CARE

FCAAIA Notes: This study tells us that the best predictor of having a moderate or severe asthma exacerbation is a history of a previous such flare.  Incorrect inhaler technique was also predictive. Of course, correct inhaler technique is a subset of using medications in the prescribed doses. If you do not use them, they will not work.

Inhaler technique is difficult to master; Continue reading “PREDICTIVE FACTORS FOR MODERATE OR SEVERE EXACERBATIONS IN ASTHMA PATIENTS RECEIVING OUTPATIENT CARE”

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