Tag: Alternative therapy

SHOULD DOCTORS EMBRACE OR REJECT ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS?

FCAAIA Notes: So called “alternative” or “complementary” treatments are not necessarily bad.  But, they are also not necessarily effective, especially as compared to medications that have under gone rigorous safety and efficacy evaluations before approval by the FDA. Proponents of alternative and complementary medicine often report their successes as anecdotes.  But, as a well-known allergist once wrote, “The plural of anecdote is not data.” Whenever someone prescribes an FDA-approved medication or recommends a remedy that is not well studied, it is OK (and usually useful) to ask “Show me the data”.  Then you can make an informed emotional decision based on science, not emotion. Continue reading “SHOULD DOCTORS EMBRACE OR REJECT ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS?”

PRENATAL FISH OIL DOES NOT REDUCE IGE-ASSOCIATED ALLERGIES IN CHILDREN

FCAAIA Notes: About 4 years ago, I posted an abstract indicating that giving infant’s fish oil did not decrease their incidence of allergic disease (“Fish Oil Does Not Prevent Early Allergies in Infants). In this study, the children of women who took either fish oil or placebo during the second half of pregnancy did not ultimately show any difference in their rates of allergic disease. Children whose mothers took fish oil were less likely to have a positive skin test to dust mites but did not have less allergic disease.

Here’s an important point however:  The thymus gland which is essential for the development of white blood cells called T cells and the development of “tolerance” (not having allergy) forms early in gestation and is already formed by 20 weeks.   To really answer the question the authors asked, I would like to see this study repeated with fish oil supplements being started as soon as the woman is known to be pregnant. Continue reading “PRENATAL FISH OIL DOES NOT REDUCE IGE-ASSOCIATED ALLERGIES IN CHILDREN”

THE SHOCKING CONFESSIONS OF A NATUROPATHIC DOCTOR

FCAAIA Notes: Primum non nocere” is Latin for “First, do no harm.” It is not part of the Hippocratic Oath, but is a principle by which we all should live. Most alternative practitioners do no direct harm.  However, by recommending tests without known diagnostic value or treatments without proven benefit, one could argue they are causing indirect harm by not using evidence based practices. Depending on the condition, this could lead to great injury over time.

The author (Dr. Britt Hermes) of this article graduated from a Naturopathic School Continue reading “THE SHOCKING CONFESSIONS OF A NATUROPATHIC DOCTOR”

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