Tag: animal dander

AAP: INDOOR ALLERGEN TESTING ‘A MUST’ FOR KIDS WITH ASTHMA

FCAAIA Notes: The vast majority of children with asthma have allergies and should have allergy testing.  Therefore, a thorough history of environmental exposures, correlated with the patient’s history and his testing results allow for focused recommendations for allergen avoidance.

The role of allergy in asthma is so well established that national and international guidelines for the care of asthma indicate that patients with persistent asthma (and allergy) should be considered candidates for allergy shots. Continue reading “AAP: INDOOR ALLERGEN TESTING ‘A MUST’ FOR KIDS WITH ASTHMA”

KIDS’ ASTHMA MORE LIKELY TO LINGER WITH PET ALLERGIES

FCAAIA Notes:  The question of which children will outgrow asthma and which will not is highly complex and cannot be answered with one study.  There are many contributing factors. It is likely that ongoing exposure to any trigger that increases allergic inflammation in the bronchi decreases likelihood of asthma resolving. Talk to your allergist about the likely allergenic exposures contributing to your child’s asthma and allergies.  Then, ask what you can do to decrease those exposures. Continue reading “KIDS’ ASTHMA MORE LIKELY TO LINGER WITH PET ALLERGIES”

‘HYPOALLERGENIC’ DOGS STILL CARRY HIGHER ALLERGEN LEVELS

FCAAIA Notes: Popular myth is that there is a so called “hypoallergenic dog”.  If there is, no one has found it yet. It seems that every time there is a new “designer breed”, a claim of hypoallergenicity is made. This study fails to support the myth of the hypoallergenic Labradoodle.

Can f 1 is the protein that is the major dog allergen. It is made by every breed. One can propose immunologic theory that might make one breed of dog more or less allergenic that another breed for an individual.  However, there are still no data to support that one breed is likely to be more or less allergenic than another breed for everyone.  The best study has not been done: Continue reading “‘HYPOALLERGENIC’ DOGS STILL CARRY HIGHER ALLERGEN LEVELS”

THE INDOOR AIR AND ASTHMA: THE ROLE OF CAT ALLERGENS

FCAAIA NOTES:  Few cat owners would have thought cats could get more complex. But from an allergy standpoint, what we know about their allergens (the proteins they make that trigger allergic symptoms) has gotten much more multifaceted. This group of researchers from the University of Virginia at Richmond  has been studying indoor allergens for decades and has produced work that led to some of our basic understanding about the indoors and allergy. Important points that are reinforced in this article: 1. Cat allergen is everywhere (schools, work places, and your home even if you do not own a cat), 2. You may or may not have a positive test to cat even if you live with one. 3. A positive test to cat does not mean you are allergic.  It means you have the immunologic potential to be allergic and must be interpreted in the context of your history, and 4. The degree of positivity of the test does not predict the degree of clinical sensitivity. Continue reading “THE INDOOR AIR AND ASTHMA: THE ROLE OF CAT ALLERGENS”

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