Tag: asthma

FOOD ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA

FCAAIA Notes: The more that is learned about the relationship between various allergic conditions (asthma, nasal allergies, food allergies, atopic dermatitis, etc.), the more complex things seem to become. It is clear that children with any allergic disease are at greater risk of another. It is of utmost importance that your allergist closely monitors the natural history of any child’s allergic disease, keeping his eyes open for even subtle hints of progression. The “atopic (or allergic) march” from eczema in infancy to asthma and allergic rhinitis by early school age is a well described phenomenon. Children with chronic or recurrent upper or lower airway symptoms should see an allergist for evaluation. Continue reading “FOOD ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA”

SWIMMING POOL ATTENDANCE, ASTHMA, ALLERGIES, AND LUNG FUNCTION IN THE AVON LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF PARENTS AND CHILDREN COHORT

FCAAIA Notes: Better physical conditioning can lead to improved overall asthma control. Swimming is often a great way for children with asthma to exercise. The humid air of indoor pools can lessen the risk of exercise-induced asthma symptoms. On the other hand, a small proportion of patients with asthma will tolerate only brominated, but not chlorinated pools. In those instances, the thin layer of chloramines that forms just above the water surface creates an irritant to the airway and triggers asthma symptoms. There is no reason to avoid chlorinated pools unless you always have problems when swimming in them. Continue reading “SWIMMING POOL ATTENDANCE, ASTHMA, ALLERGIES, AND LUNG FUNCTION IN THE AVON LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF PARENTS AND CHILDREN COHORT”

THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT AND ITS EFFECTS ON CHILDHOOD ASTHMA

FCAAIA Notes: Irritants to the airway include air pollution (indoor and outdoor), strong odors from paints, cleaning products, etc., particulates (such as dusty areas), and even the odors from indoor molds and mustiness. People with allergy and/or asthma are particularly susceptible, in that their airways are already hyperreactive (“twitchy”). Allergic inflammation of the upper airway (nose) or lower airway (asthma) makes that “twitchiness” worse. In essence, airway irritants have a synergistic (that is, the total effect is greater than the sum of the individual parts) effect with airway inflammation. Controlling and preventing the allergic airway inflammation with daily controller medications reduces the effect of irritants on the airway. Continue reading “THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT AND ITS EFFECTS ON CHILDHOOD ASTHMA”

NO INCREASED RISK FOR CATARACTS IN ASTHMATICS TAKING INHALED STEROIDS

FCAAIA Notes: Study after study has demonstrated the great safety profile of inhaled steroids for asthma or nasal steroids for allergies. These medications work directly in the airway with minimal systemic absorption. While nothing is 100% risk free (even ibuprofen!), these medications are the first line preventive choices for patients with persistent asthma or allergies. They are certainly safer than poorly controlled disease and should not be withheld only because of “steroid-phobia” (fear of steroids). The safety of these topical medications is also much greater than even a single course of oral steroids (the treatment of choice for a severe asthma flare). Once a patient achieves control of her or his asthma and allergies, it is important to gradually “step down” to the lowest controlling dose. Continue reading “NO INCREASED RISK FOR CATARACTS IN ASTHMATICS TAKING INHALED STEROIDS”

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