Tag: eczema

DOES FOOD ALLERGY CAUSE ATOPIC DERMATITIS?

FCAAIA Notes: Frankly, I don’t know anyone who has ever said that food allergy causes atopic dermatitis (AD).  However, it is correct that food allergy often triggers AD flares (just as tree pollen doesn’t cause asthma or allergies, but it triggers them). Children with AD are more likely than adults to have food trigger their symptoms. Continue reading “DOES FOOD ALLERGY CAUSE ATOPIC DERMATITIS?”

SPECIFIC ALLERGEN IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ATOPIC ECZEMA

FCAAIA Notes: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is not an indication for allergen immunotherapy (allergy shots) because there are not enough data to prove its efficacy for the condition.  However, many patients with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma (which ARE indications for allergy shots) also have AD.

When I was doing my allergy/immunology fellowship, we were taught Continue reading “SPECIFIC ALLERGEN IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ATOPIC ECZEMA”

GUIDELINES DESCRIBE USE OF PROBIOTICS IN PREVENTING ALLERGIC DISEASES

FCAAIA Notes: The best data on probiotics and allergic disease probably apply to atopic dermatitis and food allergy in infancy.  Unfortunately, while there are some studies indicating some benefits, none have been so conclusive that it is a recommendation we routinely make. Some good news is that probiotics and prebiotics are unlikely to be harmful to mother, fetus, or infant (as far as we know!).  Furthermore, not all studies use the same probiotics, so we cannot recommend a particular species.

I think the data on probiotic use to prevent allergic disease is nicely summarized by the authors and appears at the end of this article: “If probiotics are used in infants, Continue reading “GUIDELINES DESCRIBE USE OF PROBIOTICS IN PREVENTING ALLERGIC DISEASES”

PROBIOTICS AND PREBIOTICS IN PREVENTING FOOD ALLERGY AND ECZEMA

FCAAIA Notes: The microbiome (the bacteria that live in and on us) has been a recent hot topic of research.  You may have seen the New York Times Magazine a couple months ago about it.  The microbiome probably affects far more than the risk of developing allergies or asthma.  There are data suggesting it plays a role in diabetes, heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, high cholesterol, and numerous other diseases.

For years, there have been studies looking at probiotics and prebiotics to treat or prevent food allergy and atopic dermatitis.  Many are suggestive of a benefit, at least early in life. Continue reading “PROBIOTICS AND PREBIOTICS IN PREVENTING FOOD ALLERGY AND ECZEMA”

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