Tag: egg

NEW GUIDELINE FOR PREVENTION OF PEANUT ALLERGY: WHERE WE STAND NOW IN PREVENTING FOOD ALLERGIES

FCAAIA Notes: Early introduction of solids including peanut decreases the risk of later allergy.  This recently published guideline regarding early introduction of allergenic foods is an extension of the LEAP and EAT studies about which I previously posted.  Babies with severe atopic dermatiits and/or egg allergy should be tested for peanut before introduction is considered.  The new guideline also addresses approaches to groups with less risk,.

After years of recommending otherwise, I think many primary care practitioners will be slow to “get on board” with these new recommendations. Rather than delaying introduction, check with your allergist Continue reading “NEW GUIDELINE FOR PREVENTION OF PEANUT ALLERGY: WHERE WE STAND NOW IN PREVENTING FOOD ALLERGIES”

EARLY INTRODUCTION OF EGG, PEANUT LOWERS RISK FOR ALLERGY

FCAAIA Notes: The EAT (Enquiring About Tolerance) study  was published early this year by the same researchers in London who published the LEAP and LEAP-On studies.  This meta-analysis confirms the findings of EAT giving us assurance that its findings are reproducible.

Now comes a difficult question…can the findings of LEAP and EAT be extended to other foods or different risk groups?  We don’t know for sure, but consensus among allergists is that diversification of the diet and early introduction (by 6 months old) of highly allergenic foods to infants who tolerate them is likely to decrease (not eliminate) the risk of food allergy.  Continue reading “EARLY INTRODUCTION OF EGG, PEANUT LOWERS RISK FOR ALLERGY”

AAP: FLU SHOT, NOT NASAL SPRAY, RECOMMENDED FOR 2016-2017

FCAAIA Notes: If you paid attention over the last few years, there were reports that the flu shots those years were not very effective.  Unfortunately, this encouraged many patients to not be immunized because they thought it wasn’t worth it and the shot would not work. Well, I think I know why flu shots were deemed relatively ineffective the last few years:  Those statistics included children and adults who received the FluMist nasal spray for immunization.  We now know that intranasal influenza vaccine is not effective.  It is no longer available (if you were wondering why you ca’t find it anywhere) and I think we will find that  this year influenza immunization is more effective than in previous years.

As a reminder, it is safe for anyone with egg allergy to receive influenza vaccine Continue reading “AAP: FLU SHOT, NOT NASAL SPRAY, RECOMMENDED FOR 2016-2017”

EARLY INTRODUCTION OF FOOD ALLERGENS GETS MIXED RESULTS

FCAAIA Notes: The EAT study described here was a natural follow-up to last year’s LEAP study.  Unfortunately, the protocol was very difficult to follow as it required that some 3-6 month old children were given a relatively large amount of several highly allergenic foods under a strict schedule. So the majority of enrollees didn’t get enough of the foods that the authors could examine the data as they had hoped. All babies were breast fed and the control group was given no solids before 6 months old.

Nonetheless, there was still a lower incidence food allergy overall and of peanut and egg allergy in in particular in those who were given the solids early Continue reading “EARLY INTRODUCTION OF FOOD ALLERGENS GETS MIXED RESULTS”

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