Tag: GE reflux

IS THERE A ROLE FOR WEIGHT LOSS IN OBESE PATIENTS WITH ASTHMA?

FCAAIA Notes: Weight loss and good physical conditioning are so important in virtually every aspect of health that we should not just concentrate on asthma. It is pretty clear that obesity contributes to diminished respiratory status with more shortness of breath and so on.  My interpretation of the data are that at least some of that is because of other factors such as increased incidence of GE reflux, increased “work of breathing” because of the very thick and stiff chest wall, and overall de-conditioning resulting in worse exercise tolerance.

If you are overweight or obese, work hard to lose weight. Your ideal body mass index (BMI) should be 18.5-24.9.  Curious?  Continue reading “IS THERE A ROLE FOR WEIGHT LOSS IN OBESE PATIENTS WITH ASTHMA?”

TREATING GERD MAY REDUCE NASAL SYMPTOMS

FCAAIA Notes: Lots of things are connected on the inside, so we should not be surprised when one condition (in this case reflux) is associated with another (in this case nasal congestion).  I can speculate a couple of possible mechanisms:  Maybe reflux triggers a neurological reflex that leads to nasal congestion.  Maybe reflux into the back of the nose and upper throat have a direct effect causing some inflammation, irritation, swelling, and obstruction. Maybe it’s a combination or Continue reading “TREATING GERD MAY REDUCE NASAL SYMPTOMS”

THE NATURAL HISTORY OF EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS IN THE TRANSITION FROM CHILDHOOD TO ADULTHOOD

FCAAIA Notes: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a comparatively newly diagnosed (or recognized) condition.  Sometimes, it is easy to suspect from typical clinical symptoms, but sometimes its clinical presentation is much more subtle. In all cases, the diagnosis must be confirmed by biopsy of the esophagus.

The question of the natural history of EoE frequently arises.  That is, does it get better on its own?  How fast?  How often?  Continue reading “THE NATURAL HISTORY OF EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS IN THE TRANSITION FROM CHILDHOOD TO ADULTHOOD”

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