Tag: immunotherapy

DUST MITE SLIT PROMISING ADD-ON TO ASTHMA MAINTENANCE MEDS

FCAAIA Notes: I have posted many articles about sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT, under-the –tongue) on our web site.  Only grass and ragweed tablets are currently licensed in the United States.  All other forms of SLIT in the US are not FDA approved and are “off-label”.

In general, allergy shots are at least as or more effective than SLIT. In this study, dust mite SLIT was compared to placebo, but not to dust mite shots. Continue reading “DUST MITE SLIT PROMISING ADD-ON TO ASTHMA MAINTENANCE MEDS”

SPECIFIC ALLERGEN IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ATOPIC ECZEMA

FCAAIA Notes: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is not an indication for allergen immunotherapy (allergy shots) because there are not enough data to prove its efficacy for the condition.  However, many patients with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma (which ARE indications for allergy shots) also have AD.

When I was doing my allergy/immunology fellowship, we were taught Continue reading “SPECIFIC ALLERGEN IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ATOPIC ECZEMA”

INADEQUATE HEALTH INSURANCE LEADS TO DISCONTINUATION OF SCIT

FCAAIA Notes: There are only 2 proven and natural cures for airway allergy: Avoidance of the allergens and allergy shots. As effective as injections are, we recognize they are an inconvenience.  Studies from many years ago show that in the long run, injections coast LESS than staying ion medications, particularly if you add in the indirect costs of illness such as lost time from work. But, when we talk about costs, we are talking about TOTAL costs (what you insurance company pays plus your out-of-pocket costs).

Unfortunately, the current state of medical insurance is that your co-pays and deductibles are higher and your insurance company pays less every year Continue reading “INADEQUATE HEALTH INSURANCE LEADS TO DISCONTINUATION OF SCIT”

EVIDENCE DOES NOT SUPPORT USING SLIT TO TREAT SARC

FCAAIA Notes: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in which melt-away tablets are placed under the tongue is an attractive idea because of its convenience.  In the United States, SLIT has only been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for grass and ragweed pollens. SLIT for those allergens is proven better than placebo, but as this study shows, it is not much better. When compared to allergy shots, injections are usually proven more effective than SLIT.  Continue reading “EVIDENCE DOES NOT SUPPORT USING SLIT TO TREAT SARC”

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