Tag: microbiome

EARLY‐LIFE ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE INCREASES THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALLERGIC SYMPTOMS LATER IN LIFE: A META‐ANALYSIS

FCAAIA Notes: Here’s another one of those chicken and egg questions.  Are children at risk for allergic disease more likely to require antibiotics (for ear infection, for instance) than those without great risk? Or, do the antibiotics increase the risk? Or both

Antibiotics (and other things) change the human microbiome (the bacteria that normally live in and on us).  Alterations of the microbiome have been associated with numerous diseases (including allergies and asthma) over the last several years and is a major area of on-going research.

My vote on the chicken/egg question here? “Both.” Continue reading “EARLY‐LIFE ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE INCREASES THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALLERGIC SYMPTOMS LATER IN LIFE: A META‐ANALYSIS”

UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PROBIOTICS AND PREBIOTICS IN PREVENTING ALLERGIC DISEASE

FCAAIA Notes: I posted this article for you because it portends something about which we will read more in the future. The role of the human microbiome (the microorganisms that normally live in and on us) is a topic of recent research. These organisms somehow affect us in innumerable ways.  Pre- and probiotics affect the quality of the microbiome. But, not all supplements are created equally!  Some pre- and probiotic supplementation may help control or prevent some illnesses.  Others might not. One could also make the theoretical argument that pre- or probiotics might change the microbiome with adverse effects, making some conditions worse.  Things get even more complicated when you factor in the possible role of epigenetics (the way some of your genes Continue reading “UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PROBIOTICS AND PREBIOTICS IN PREVENTING ALLERGIC DISEASE”

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