Tag: natural history

EARLY‐LIFE ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE INCREASES THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALLERGIC SYMPTOMS LATER IN LIFE: A META‐ANALYSIS

FCAAIA Notes: Here’s another one of those chicken and egg questions.  Are children at risk for allergic disease more likely to require antibiotics (for ear infection, for instance) than those without great risk? Or, do the antibiotics increase the risk? Or both

Antibiotics (and other things) change the human microbiome (the bacteria that normally live in and on us).  Alterations of the microbiome have been associated with numerous diseases (including allergies and asthma) over the last several years and is a major area of on-going research.

My vote on the chicken/egg question here? “Both.” Continue reading “EARLY‐LIFE ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE INCREASES THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALLERGIC SYMPTOMS LATER IN LIFE: A META‐ANALYSIS”

BREASTFEEDING DOES NOT PROTECT CHILDREN AGAINST ASTHMA AND ALLERGIES

FCAAIA Notes: Let me start off by saying you should not stop nursing your baby just because of these data. Breast feeding has numerous health benefits independent of whether it affects the likelihood of developing allergic air way diseases (asthma and allergies) or not.

I first heard data like these about 20 years ago in a meeting of investigators at the NIH.  But, then and now the discussion centered on the numerous factors affecting asthma and allergy risk.  There are some over which we have no or little control Continue reading “BREASTFEEDING DOES NOT PROTECT CHILDREN AGAINST ASTHMA AND ALLERGIES”

PEDIATRICIANS NOT EMBRACING NEW PEANUT GUIDELINES

FCAAIA Notes: It is quite clear that for infants who tolerate peanut products, early and regular introduction (before 1 year old) decreases the likelihood of peanut allergy by 80%. When the LEAP study data were published a few years ago, it caused a 180º reversal of our previous recommendations.

Old habits die hard, however. Some pediatricians are still hesitant to recommend early introduction even to their healthy 4-6 month old patients. Patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis and/or egg allergy are considered “high risk” for developing peanut allergy (based on the entry criteria of the study) and should be evaluated by an allergist before Continue reading “PEDIATRICIANS NOT EMBRACING NEW PEANUT GUIDELINES”

WHEN ‘ALLERGIC TO PENICILLIN’ ISN’T TRUE IN CHILDREN

FCAAIA Notes: Up to 95% of people labelled allergic to penicillin are not.  They either out grew their allergy or the reaction they had was not allergic. Some were even told to avoid it because a relative was allergic.  If you think you are allergic to penicillin, discuss it with your allergist. Penicillin skin testing is easy to do and easy to interpret. Negative penicillin testing is often followed by an observed challenge in the office.  Sometimes the history is so remote that challenge isn’t even essential).

I don’t necessarily agree with Dr. Basco’s first sentence below.  Continue reading “WHEN ‘ALLERGIC TO PENICILLIN’ ISN’T TRUE IN CHILDREN”

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