Tag: natural history

PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR PEANUT ALLERGIES

FCAAIA Notes:  I’m so far behind schedule in updating our website, that this review isn’t such news anymore.  But, it is a good reminder that our approach to feeding infants highly allergenic foods took a 180º turn several years or so ago.

It is now clear that early introduction and continued feeding of peanut and egg (if tolerated) greatly decreases the likelihood of the infant becoming allergic.  Although there are no data that the same thing holds for other foods, we have no reason to believe it does not. Continue reading “PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR PEANUT ALLERGIES”

DETECTION OF IGE REACTIVITY TO A HANDFUL OF ALLERGEN MOLECULES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD PREDICTS RESPIRATORY ALLERGY IN ADOLESCENCE

FCAAIA Notes: As allergists, we spend a lot of time thinking ahead.  What will be the natural course of our patient’s disease? Of course, no one can predict the future, but we are able to glean some good clues to make an educated prediction.

A positive test for any allergen does not tell you that you are allergic.  It merely indicates that you have the immunologic potential to become so. A diagnosis of allergy requires symptoms, not just a positive test.

This study confirms and extends previous findings that the presence of the allergic antibody (IgE) to certain allergens in the preschool years significantly increases the risk of persistent allergies and/or asthma during the teen years. Continue reading “DETECTION OF IGE REACTIVITY TO A HANDFUL OF ALLERGEN MOLECULES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD PREDICTS RESPIRATORY ALLERGY IN ADOLESCENCE”

EARLY‐LIFE ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE INCREASES THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALLERGIC SYMPTOMS LATER IN LIFE: A META‐ANALYSIS

FCAAIA Notes: Here’s another one of those chicken and egg questions.  Are children at risk for allergic disease more likely to require antibiotics (for ear infection, for instance) than those without great risk? Or, do the antibiotics increase the risk? Or both

Antibiotics (and other things) change the human microbiome (the bacteria that normally live in and on us).  Alterations of the microbiome have been associated with numerous diseases (including allergies and asthma) over the last several years and is a major area of on-going research.

My vote on the chicken/egg question here? “Both.” Continue reading “EARLY‐LIFE ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE INCREASES THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALLERGIC SYMPTOMS LATER IN LIFE: A META‐ANALYSIS”

BREASTFEEDING DOES NOT PROTECT CHILDREN AGAINST ASTHMA AND ALLERGIES

FCAAIA Notes: Let me start off by saying you should not stop nursing your baby just because of these data. Breast feeding has numerous health benefits independent of whether it affects the likelihood of developing allergic air way diseases (asthma and allergies) or not.

I first heard data like these about 20 years ago in a meeting of investigators at the NIH.  But, then and now the discussion centered on the numerous factors affecting asthma and allergy risk.  There are some over which we have no or little control Continue reading “BREASTFEEDING DOES NOT PROTECT CHILDREN AGAINST ASTHMA AND ALLERGIES”

Skip to content