Tag: peanut allergy

PEDIATRICIANS NOT EMBRACING NEW PEANUT GUIDELINES

FCAAIA Notes: It is quite clear that for infants who tolerate peanut products, early and regular introduction (before 1 year old) decreases the likelihood of peanut allergy by 80%. When the LEAP study data were published a few years ago, it caused a 180º reversal of our previous recommendations.

Old habits die hard, however. Some pediatricians are still hesitant to recommend early introduction even to their healthy 4-6 month old patients. Patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis and/or egg allergy are considered “high risk” for developing peanut allergy (based on the entry criteria of the study) and should be evaluated by an allergist before Continue reading “PEDIATRICIANS NOT EMBRACING NEW PEANUT GUIDELINES”

IMMUNOTHERAPY PATCH DESENSITIZES PEANUT ALLERGY

FCAAIA Notes: The “peanut patch” is not FDA approved and is not commercially available. Let’s assume it is someday.  Then, what might we expect from it?  Use of the patch will not “cure” peanut allergy, nor will it be a free license to eat peanut products. Users will still need to avoid peanut in their diets at least as things stand now. At this point it seems that the patch merely increases the amount of peanut that must be ingested before there is a clinical reaction and the increase in the amount tolerated will vary from patient to patient.  There also no data as to what happens if someone stops using the patch.  Continue reading “IMMUNOTHERAPY PATCH DESENSITIZES PEANUT ALLERGY”

NEW GUIDELINE FOR PREVENTION OF PEANUT ALLERGY: WHERE WE STAND NOW IN PREVENTING FOOD ALLERGIES

FCAAIA Notes: Early introduction of solids including peanut decreases the risk of later allergy.  This recently published guideline regarding early introduction of allergenic foods is an extension of the LEAP and EAT studies about which I previously posted.  Babies with severe atopic dermatiits and/or egg allergy should be tested for peanut before introduction is considered.  The new guideline also addresses approaches to groups with less risk,.

After years of recommending otherwise, I think many primary care practitioners will be slow to “get on board” with these new recommendations. Rather than delaying introduction, check with your allergist Continue reading “NEW GUIDELINE FOR PREVENTION OF PEANUT ALLERGY: WHERE WE STAND NOW IN PREVENTING FOOD ALLERGIES”

EARLY INTRODUCTION OF EGG, PEANUT LOWERS RISK FOR ALLERGY

FCAAIA Notes: The EAT (Enquiring About Tolerance) study  was published early this year by the same researchers in London who published the LEAP and LEAP-On studies.  This meta-analysis confirms the findings of EAT giving us assurance that its findings are reproducible.

Now comes a difficult question…can the findings of LEAP and EAT be extended to other foods or different risk groups?  We don’t know for sure, but consensus among allergists is that diversification of the diet and early introduction (by 6 months old) of highly allergenic foods to infants who tolerate them is likely to decrease (not eliminate) the risk of food allergy.  Continue reading “EARLY INTRODUCTION OF EGG, PEANUT LOWERS RISK FOR ALLERGY”

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