Tag: quality of life

UNCONTROLLED ASTHMA MAY LEAD TO EMOTIONAL DISORDERS

FCAAIA Notes: The association between chronic diseases (yes, asthma IS a chronic disease) and psychological conditions including depression was well established years ago.  The proverbial “chicken-egg” question has always been part of the equation. Things seems to work both ways: Patients with depression are more likely to have chronic disease, complications of their disease, and a greater impact on their quality of life by their disease.  Conversely, patients with chronic disease (especially poorly controlled) are more likely to become depressed.

So, if you have poorly controlled asthma take care of your mental as well as your physical health. Continue reading “UNCONTROLLED ASTHMA MAY LEAD TO EMOTIONAL DISORDERS”

CHILDREN OFTEN RATE THEIR ASTHMA WORSE THAN PARENTS REPORT

FCAAIA Notes: Nobody but the patient can really know how the patient feels. An old paradigm is that children 12 and older are better at identifying the impact their allergies and asthma have on their quality of life and that under 12 years old, the parents are better at rating their children’s quality of life.  This study indicates that maybe we should give 4-11 year old children more credit for recognizing their symptoms. For instance, a child will know if he wakes up in the middle of the night but if he doesn’t tell his mother, she will never know.  How can a parent know that his daughter’s asthma worsens with exercise if she doesn’t tell him or he doesn’t ask. I ask my patients these questions and a parent often exclaims, “You didn’t tell me that!”  Of course, the parent didn’t ask the question.  The point here is that our patients have something to tell us and we need to listen.

(Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/834837?nlid=70059_281&src=wnl_edit_medp_aimm&uac=112079PK&spon=38  November 12, 2014For Medscape articles: User name: FCAAIA, Password: Allergies)

Parental assessment of a child’s asthma severity can sometimes underestimate the child’s level of discomfort and control Continue reading “CHILDREN OFTEN RATE THEIR ASTHMA WORSE THAN PARENTS REPORT”

EGG AND MILK ALLERGIES HARDEST ON CAREGIVER QUALITY OF LIFE

FCAAIA Notes: There is no question whatsoever that food allergy has a huge impact on the quality of life of patients and their family members. Our relatively recent recognition that many children with milk and egg allergy can tolerate the foods in baked products certainly helps ease the burden on the family. However, it does eliminate the burden.  Speak with your allergist about strategies to improve you and your family’s food-related quality of life.

Along those lines it is important that you not be labeled allergic to a food that you tolerate. I have frequent conversations with my patients Continue reading “EGG AND MILK ALLERGIES HARDEST ON CAREGIVER QUALITY OF LIFE”

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