Tag: SLIT (allergy “drops”)

IS RESPONSE TO ALLERGY IMMUNOTHERAPY PREDICTABLE?

FCAAIA Notes: Allergen immunotherapy (IT) is the only disease-modifying treatment and thus the only potential cure for allergies. People respond at different rates to different extents, but it is a highly effective treatment.

For IT to be helpful, you need to come regularly to build up to the top dose.  High doses are more effective than lower doses. Continue reading “IS RESPONSE TO ALLERGY IMMUNOTHERAPY PREDICTABLE?”

EVIDENCE DOES NOT SUPPORT USING SLIT TO TREAT SARC

FCAAIA Notes: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in which melt-away tablets are placed under the tongue is an attractive idea because of its convenience.  In the United States, SLIT has only been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for grass and ragweed pollens. SLIT for those allergens is proven better than placebo, but as this study shows, it is not much better. When compared to allergy shots, injections are usually proven more effective than SLIT.  Continue reading “EVIDENCE DOES NOT SUPPORT USING SLIT TO TREAT SARC”

EOE DEVELOPED IN PATIENTS WITH IGE-MEDIATED FOOD ALLERGY AFTER OIT

FCAAIA Notes: Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) has been recognized with increasing frequency in a variety of settings.  It can present in a variety of ways, in part depend on the patients age.  In some, it presents as gastroesophageal reflux unresponsive to high doses of reflux medications.  In infant it can present as food refusal and failure to thrive.  In older children and adults, it might just present as intermittent food impaction with swallowing.

There is a lot of interest and research in oral desensitization to foods (OIT) and to sublingual (under the tongue) immunotherapy (SLIT) for nasal allergies. Continue reading “EOE DEVELOPED IN PATIENTS WITH IGE-MEDIATED FOOD ALLERGY AFTER OIT”

FDA CLEARS SUBLINGUAL RAGWITEK FOR RAGWEED ALLERGY

FCAAIA Notes: The last time I updated articles on this website, I posted news about FDA approval of sublingual (under-the tongue) treatment for grass allergy. (See “FDA OKs Oralair, First US Sublingual Allergy Immunotherapy”). The same caveats I noted then apply to Ragwitek.  That is, it is useful for just one allergen (ragweed), not for other weeds or anything else.  Treatment must be started 3-4 months before the onset of ragweed pollination (usually about August 15th in Connecticut) and it must be used daily with the tablet kept under the tongue for at least a minute. The tablets are reported to cost $7-$8 each and may or may not be covered by insurance companies.

But, this is still a reasonable treatment option next summer for patients with significant and bothersome symptoms from ragweed exposure.

Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has not been studied for any other pollens Continue reading “FDA CLEARS SUBLINGUAL RAGWITEK FOR RAGWEED ALLERGY”

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