Tag: upper-lower airway connection

IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS AND LOWER AIRWAY OUTCOMES

FCAAIA Notes: I have written about the upper-lower airway connection in this blog many times.  Most young people with asthma have allergies and 20-60% of those with allergies will develop asthma.  The two conditions can be thought of as the same disease affecting different ends of the respiratory system or “allergic airway disease”.

There is a large literature supporting the fact that treating the upper airway (nose) can lead to improved control of the lower airway (asthma).  In fact, the most recent iteration of national guidelines for the care of asthma tell us that anyone with persistent asthma (defined in part as symptoms >2 days per week or night time symptoms > 2 nights per month) and allergies should consider allergy shots as a potential cure for his allergic airway disease. Continue reading “IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS AND LOWER AIRWAY OUTCOMES”

UNTREATED RHINITIS OFTEN PRECEDES ASTHMA IN ELDERLY

FCAAIA Notes: It is well-recognized that infants with atopic dermatitis (eczema) frequently develop nasal allergy (allergic rhinitis) and asthma as young as school-age.  This phenomenon, known as the “allergic march” (or “atopic march”) requires close observation and a low index of suspicion with new onset of airway symptoms.  It is also well established that allergy shots given when a patient has allergic rhinitis but not asthma substantially decreases his likelihood of developing asthma.

This study shows that older adults with rhinitis (many were only 65 years old….I won’t call them “elderly”!) Continue reading “UNTREATED RHINITIS OFTEN PRECEDES ASTHMA IN ELDERLY”

ALLERGIC RHINITIS IS ASSOCIATED WITH POOR ASTHMA CONTROL IN CHILDREN WITH ASTHMA

FCAAIA Notes:  To paraphrase an old song from childhood, “The nose bone’s connected to the lung bone”. In so many ways and for so many people, allergic rhinitis (nasal allergies) and asthma are the same disease, affecting the same airway at opposite ends. Development of allergic rhinitis frequently precedes that of asthma and flares of rhinitis frequently precede flares of asthma.  Treating nasal allergies in patients with both conditions usually helps improve control of asthma as well. This study is yet another reminder that the two conditions cannot be considered independently and that patients with one are at very high risk of developing the other. Continue reading “ALLERGIC RHINITIS IS ASSOCIATED WITH POOR ASTHMA CONTROL IN CHILDREN WITH ASTHMA”

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